Focusing on late Victorian and Edwardian civic architecture, this project (2018-21) re-evaluates the relationship between architecture, imperialism, and national identity in Britain and the wider British world (i.e., 'Greater Britain') through an examination of the English Baroque Revival in architectural design. 

Focusing on late Victorian and Edwardian civic architecture, this project (2018-21) re-evaluates the relationship between architecture, imperialism, and national identity in Britain and the wider British world (i.e., 'Greater Britain') through an examination of the English Baroque Revival in architectural design. Often referred to as ‘Edwardian Baroque’, this important if obscure phase in the history of British architecture was part of the neo-classical resurgence in public architecture that occurred during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but which to date has received little scholarly attention. Emerging from and thus symbolising the renewed engagement with empire following Benjamin Disraeli’s ‘new imperial’ politics of the 1870s, the Edwardian Baroque can be understood as a prominent material culture expression of this particular episode in the political and cultural history of Britain. By situating this architecture in its proper cultural context, one of the principal aims of the study will be to connect it to broader currents in British history, politics, and empire.

Funding

Leverhulme Trust, Major Research Fellowship, £140,000.

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