Job title: Director of Research, ECA

Tel: +44 (0) 131 651 5724

Email: E.Hollis@ed.ac.uk

Current PhD students

Pau Catà i Marlès

Silvia Ojeda García

Obioma Oji

Nancy Johnson

Susan Fallouh

Jennifer Gray

Raghda Hareri

Lore Said

Gillian Treacy

PhD Supervision Topics

Edward Hollis studied Architecture at Cambridge and Edinburgh Universities; and practiced as an architect for six years, first in Sri Lanka, in the practice of Geoffrey Bawa, at that time the ‘grand old man’ of Sri Lankan Architecture, famous for his garden of follies and ruins at Lunuganga; and then in the practice of Richard Murphy, well known for his radical alterations to ancient and historic buildings in and around Edinburgh.

In 1999, Edward Hollis began lecturing in Interior Architecture at Napier University, Edinburgh, working with students both in the design studio, and in more theoretical disciplines. In 2004, he moved to Edinburgh College of Art, where until 2012, he ran undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in Interior Design.

In 2012, Hollis became Deputy Director of Research across Edinburgh College of Art, co-ordinating our submission to the Research Excellence Framework 2014 in Art, Design and History of Art. He is now Director of Research ECA, working across the school assisting staff in developing research interests and projects of their own.

Working with follies and ruins in Sri Lanka, with modern interventions to historic buildings in Scotland, and in the notoriously slippery discipline of Interiors, has focussed Hollis' research and theoretical thinking on building stories and narrative structures connecting time, folk tale, and the built environment.

Edward Hollis is currently involved with plans to revive the ruins of Gillespie Kidd and Coia’s seminary at Cardross. His first book, ‘The Secret Lives of Buildings’: a collection of folk tales stories about mythical buildings was published in 2009; and his second ‘The Memory Palace: a book of lost Interiors’ was published in 2013. His third book, ‘How to Make a Home’ was published for the School of Life in 2016.