Job title: British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Visiting Teaching Fellow

Email: Luca.Palozzi@ed.ac.uk

Current PhD students

No PhD students at present.

PhD Supervision Topics

  • The Renaissance in the Round: Sculptors, Space and Three-Dimensionality in Trecento Italy

I specialise in Medieval and Early Renaissance Italian art, namely sculpture, with an emphasis on:

  • the porosities between art theory and art practice;
  • the dialectic between the different artistic media;
  • style, artistic geography, reception and historiography.

Grants and Awards

  • British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship (2015-18)
  • Association of Art Historians’ Museums and Exhibitions Bursary (2015)
  • Henry Moore Postdoctoral Fellowship (2012-14)
  • Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento, Florence, Predoctoral Fellowship (2011)

Selected Publications

Articles and Book Chapters

‘Petrarch and Memorial Art: Blurring the Borders Between Art Theory and Art Practice in Trecento Italy’, in Jessica Barker, Ann Adams and Susie Nash (eds), Revisiting the Monument: Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture Fifty Years On, London: Courtauld Books Online, Forthcoming 2016.

‘Venetian or Adriatic? Refocusing the Geography of Late-Medieval Stone Sculpture in the Central Adriatic Basin: Four Case Studies’, Hortus Artium Medievalium 20/2 (2014): 861-73.

‘Talenti provinciali: Il cardinale francescano Gentile Partino da Montefiore e un’aggiunta alla scultura umbra del Trecento’ [‘Talenti provinciali: Franciscan Cardinal Gentile Partino of Montefiore and a Supplement to Trecento Umbrian Sculpture’], in Civiltà urbana e committenze artistiche al tempo del Maestro di Offida (secoli XIV-XV), Conf. Proceed. (Ascoli Piceno, 1-3 December 2011), Silvia Maddalo and Isa Lori Sanfilippo (eds), Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medioevo, 2013, pp. 243-266.

‘Una congiuntura romana nella Marca di fine Duecento? Il vescovo francescano Rambotto Vicomanni e la cattedrale di Santa Maria Maggiore a Camerino’ [‘A Roman Connection in the Marca of the late Duecento? The Franciscan Bishop Rambotto Vicomanni and the Cathedral of Santa Maria Maggiore in Camerino’], in La catedral medieval Porticvm: Revista d’Estudis Medievals 3 (2012): 56-71.

Books

L’arca di Sant’Ansovino nel duomo di Camerino. Ricerche sulla scultura tardo-trecentesca nelle Marche [The Arca di Sant’Ansovino in the Cathedral of Camerino: A Study on Late Trecento Sculpture in the Marche], Milan: Silvana Editoriale, 2010. Find out more about this book 

 

Catalogue entries 

In 2012-2014 I helped to catalogue the sculptures of the Museo d’Arte Antica del Castello Sforzesco, Milan, to prepare the catalogue’s first two volumes for publication: Museo d’Arte Antica del Castello Sforzesco. Scultura lapidea, vols 1-2, Maria Teresa Fiorio and Graziano Alfredo Vergani (eds), Milan: Electa, 2013-2014.

Research Projects

  • The Renaissance in the Round: Sculptors, Space and Three-Dimensionality in Trecento Italy

This is my British Academy research project. It expands on my previous work to explore and thereby problematize the marginal position of sculpture and sculptors in early Renaissance discourses on the arts. 

  • Commentators on Medieval Italian Sculpture (14th-19th c.)

I am completing a monograph entitled Commentators on Medieval Italian Sculpture (14th-19th c.): Hard to Make, Difficult to Talk About, investigating how observers from different periods, cultural backgrounds and geographical areas in Italy came to terms with, and made sense of, the sculptural objects from their medieval past. The main outcome from a Henry Moore Postdoctoral Fellowship I held at the University of Edinburgh, this book is conceived as an investigation into the achievements, difficulties (and failures) of early commentators, as well as our own, and the proverbial ‘difficulty’ of sculpture in general. Why is it that sculpture is so difficult to talk about?

  • Two Moments in the Career of Marco Romano (and the Introduction of the Gothic Style to Italy)
  • Virgin and Child by the Master of the Gualino St Catherine in the National Museum of Scotland (with Dr Rachel King, National Museums Scotland). Dr King and I were awarded a prestigious Association of Art Historians’ Museum and Exhibition Bursary in 2015. Here you can read more about this project