A Lecturer in Landscape Architecture and PhD student in Architecture by Design has been selected as one of five winners in the LA+ Iconoclast ideas competition for Central Park in New York. The international prize invited participants to reimagine and redesign Central Park for the 21st Century, after a presumed eco-terrorist attack. Tiago Torres-Campos’ design was selected from 193 entries across 30 countries.

With his proposal entitled ‘The Geoscraper of the Captive Biomes’, Tiago reimagined the park in the year 2118, one hundred years after the attack. The design proposed the Geoscraper as a giant horizontal skyscraper, a performative landscape machine whose first function is to captivate the Earth’s biomes. The proposal is narrated through the eyes of a New Yorker who was born in the park’s temporary housing pods, grew up accustomed to the its newly reinvented geological, ecological, and social functions, and eventually found her vocation as an MP, working at the park’s Earth Parliament. Tiago wins $4000 in prize money and will feature publication in LA+ Journal’s forthcoming LA+ ICONOCLAST issue (out in Autumn 2019).


Tiago’s conceptual project invited us to slow down and attune ourselves to gentle practices of noticing and making sense of the world.

The project is an invitation to rethink the contemporary role of what is arguably one of the most iconic landscapes in the world. Moving away from Law Olmsted’s image of the park as a nineteenth century picturesque landscape, Tiago’s conceptual project invited us to slow down and attune ourselves to gentle practices of noticing and making sense of the world. It also encourages the opening of a crucial door into rethinking our enmeshed human relations with other entities with whom we share our home planet.



The Geoscraper stems from Tiago’s current research-by-design interests focusing on the Anthropocene theory, which originated as a hypothesis in the earth sciences to designate a new geological era in which humans are the dominant geomorphic force altering the Earth’s planetary systems. Tiago is currently doing a PhD in Architecture by Design, where he focuses on issues of representation arising from the study of the relations between Manhattan and the set of geologic conditions in which it forcefully exists. He is also co-teaching a post-graduate architectural and landscape architectural design studio looking at the island conditions of Manhattan.




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