A CD released as part of a research project that allows listeners the opportunity to experience the sounds and sensations of early music performance, reached number two in the Specialist Classical Music charts. 

The CD, Music for the King of Scots: The Pleasure Palace of James IV, was released as part of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded project ‘Space, Place, Sound, and Memory: Immersive Experiences of the Past’.  

The project used technological reconstruction of the acoustic of the now-ruined Chapel Royal of Linlithgow Palace to allow listeners the opportunity to experience the sounds and sensations of early music performance. Music from the famous Carver Choirbook – one of only two large-scale collections of music to survive from pre-Reformation Scotland – was chosen for the recording.  

Professional singers from the acclaimed Binchois Consort recorded the music in an anechoic chamber – a setting which has close to no natural acoustics – which was then overlaid with the reconstructed acoustic modelling of the chapel. 

Music for the King of Scots held the number two spot in the Specialist Classical Charts for two weeks and was the subject of an hour-long edition of BBC Radio 3’s The Early Music show, titled ‘Linlithgow Palace Reborn’.  

The virtual reality experience is available as a CD launched by Hyperion Records with companion apps available in the Google Play Store.